Category Archives: Scoop.it

A Guide to Perfect Social Media Posts (Infographic)

What does a perfect social media post look like? Some detailed tips for creating the best posts possible.

Source: www.entrepreneur.com

Some good concise information here, very easy to use and if you want your social media to get some attention, I challenge you to tell me you can’t do one thing better as a result of this post.

Continue reading

Posted in Scoop.it | Leave a comment

Should Map Apps Be Regulated In Cars? – WBUR

Should Map Apps Be Regulated In Cars?
WBUR
A driver holds an iPhone with Google Maps while at a red light. (Steve Garfield/Flickr). The U.S.

Source: hereandnow.wbur.org

This line of questioning is starting to stir some debate. As Peggy Smedley says, if car manufacturers don’t put cool, but often distracting apps into cars, they will often lose sales to other marques that do.

 

We have many distracting apps in our cars, I think navigation has been well proven to reduce accidents, but that doesn’t apply to all of them.

 

I’ve had a couple of contradictory but interesting experience’s with Google’s Waze app, which a couple of colleagues have raved about so much that I have started to use it again ad compared it to my latest TomTom which I love even though I had 2 less than perfect experiences with it recently that probably stand out because they are absolute rarities and I have been spoiled to expect an outstanding experience every time.

 

So when I use Waze, it often invites me to interact while driving. Of course it is a crowd sourced data solution and it relies largely on its users to inform it about incidents, Police on the side of the road, speed cameras and so in. It also asks for confirmation that an accident, a car on the side of the freeway are still there, or when it detects heavy traffic, comes up with a quick select menu of things that might be the cause. All great stuff, but if you are alone in your car, it is certainly attraction (against the T&C if you read them) to get you to respond to what is going on and you know that if you don’t and others also don’t because of the risk of being distracted, no one would end up with information.

 

On the flip side, the other day I was a passenger in a car and tried to start up Waze. I was in a Taxi and the Wellington cab driver, who said yes, when I asked him how to get to y destination, finally admitted that he didn’t. I pointed out that he could use the nav in his taxi system and suggested he enter the address there, which he finally did, on the side of the road as the meter was ticking. So we started driving again and the screen locked up. I thought there was something wrong with the phone, but then I noticed a warning message asking me to please click a button to confirm I was not the driver entering my destination whilst driving a car. Great idea, but it would have been cool to perhaps have a n audible alert every time I touched the screen until I confirmed that yes I was a passenger. Having been in the mobile data and mobile device industry for many years I wasn’t expecting this feature and my instincts kicked in to figure out what the technical problem was, thus being even more distracted.

 

Do you think car GPS devices are distracting and dangerous, say in comparison to using your mobile or deciding what to listen to on your Internet Radio?

Continue reading

Posted in Scoop.it | Leave a comment

Reducing traffic congestion in Vietnam’s major cities – Tuoitrenews

Reducing traffic congestion in Vietnam’s major cities
Tuoitrenews
Many experts now consider intelligent transportation systems (ITS) as the solution. London was able to reduce traffic to mid-1980 levels using ITS.

Source: tuoitrenews.vn

Excellent article showing some of the differences as well as commonalities between eastern and western cities. In some places getting a car is a status symbol, especially in Asia, but in others it doesn’t make sense at all when there is good economic public transport.

 

It’s not surprising to see IBM mentioned here, especially when it comes to designing modern cities where people can live, work and play. Unfortunately most cities are not designed that way, so ITS and changes in work culture become important.

 

The toughest is when large corporations still don’t, or feel they can’t allow more people to spend some time working from home, or using flexi-time, allowing staff to go to and from work outside of peak traffic times. Big employers should really show some good citizenship and explore how they can make this work. There is plenty of technology such as unified communications that can not only make it easy for staff to work and stay connected, but also for their management, who in some cases effectively don’t trust their staff to not be distracted when working from home.

 

There are of course people who by the nature of their job have to be on site all of their working time. There are plenty who don’t. Sometimes the most effective solutions are very simple and low tech.

Continue reading

Posted in Scoop.it | Leave a comment

Three Rivers Park Debuts GPS Tracker For Vulnerable Guests – CBS Local

Three Rivers Park Debuts GPS Tracker For Vulnerable Guests
CBS Local
MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — The Three Rivers Park District is debuting a GPS tracking system to protect vulnerable guests.

Source: minnesota.cbslocal.com

This is a fantastic story. Living in New Zealand where thousands of people explore bush and mountain tracks every day, we constantly hear stories of everyone from school groups to hunters and even casual day trippers getting lost. Just this weekend we had a group of school girls who needed a rescue on a tramping trip where a river suddenly rose and blocked off the track they had intended taking.

 

If you took all the money that is spent on search and rescue each year, you could probably invest in a lot of these or similar devices. It’s mandatory to have emergency equipment including radio on boats and most of them also have GPS. I’m not saying it should be mandatory but it would certainly be smart to have technology like this available for casual trampers. More experienced ones also need rescuing but are more likely to have some form of technology already because they understand the risk.

 

I frequently blog in this space around people with dementia, diabetics and other conditions that can leave them distressed, confused and disoriented, but this technology also has benefits to those who may be super fit and healthy.

Continue reading

Posted in Scoop.it | Leave a comment

How to start a food blog: everything you need to know – Telegraph.co.uk

Telegraph.co.uk
How to start a food blog: everything you need to know
Telegraph.co.uk
Create your blog on blogger.com, which is the platform I use, or wordpress.com – both are free and easy to set up.

Source: www.telegraph.co.uk

Some good easy to follow advice here on how to put together a special interest  blog. Whether its about food or something else, the advice is transferable. Nicely presented. It’s interesting how often people give blog advice, but don’t seem to follow it themselves.

Continue reading

Posted in Scoop.it | Leave a comment

Apple Maps To Offer Choice Of Google, Others For Directions – Search Engine Land

Hindustan Times Apple Maps To Offer Choice Of Google, Others For Directions Search Engine Land In other words if you like the way, for example, Waze or Scout provides directions, those apps will be triggered from Apple Maps itself when you select a…

Source: searchengineland.com

It’s interesting that this is only after you have identified your destination. One of the things I like about Waze (not its real tie traffic information which hasn’t been very good to me in the last few days) is that it allows you to use other services to locate Points of Interest. Despite it being owned by Google, quite often the business I am looking for does not exist on the Waze database, but it lets me look for it in other data-sets.

Continue reading

Posted in Scoop.it | Leave a comment

Mobile apps offer last-minute deals – Muncie Star Press

Mobile apps offer last-minute deals
Muncie Star Press
NEW YORK — While new technology and mobile applications have made old-fashion road trips easier, the thrill of spontaneity and surprise still remains.

Source: www.thestarpress.com

I haven’t heard of Breather before. There’s always something new! I’d like to think my network is big enough to find me a spot in a lot of cities around the world (would you offer me a hot desk for a couple of hours?) but if its location based and I need somewhere just for an hour, (I’ve used libraries for this in the past) handy to the location between meetings, this would be great!

Continue reading

Posted in Scoop.it | Leave a comment

Toyota Seeks Patents on Warning and Navigation Systems – IPWatchdog.com

Toyota Seeks Patents on Warning and Navigation Systems IPWatchdog.com 20140172290, entitled Navigation of On-Road Vehicle Based on Vertical Elements, would protect an apparatus comprised of a navigational unit which determines the position of a…

Source: www.ipwatchdog.com

This is a really interesting article about patents being developed and sought by Toyota. The motor industry is full of innovation even though a lot of it takes decades to filter through to the new car sales lot.

 

Of course all car manufacturers do this. I used to love seeing the car design competitions Honda used to run for its staff, where they could create any kind of car they wanted, which ranged from the solar powered vehicles through to cars with built in spa pools.

 

A lot of car concepts come from left field, but then it takes years to persuade an organization to go ahead with a radical concept and then design, get OEM components built, order parts years in advance etc. Look at HUDS (Heads Up Displays) they were in science fiction movies and TV shows when I was little, but even today they are only in a minority of upmarket cars.

 

When I see concepts like ITS technology that can allow a car to know how far away and how fast the car in front of you is driving, I get excited. Especially when  see things like the frequent nose to tail crashes on our motorways. But then I get really frustrated when the technology is proprietary.

 

I mean, who wants to buy a Volvo that can identify the speed of the car in front, avoid a collision with it, if i slams on the breaks to avoid a hedgehog crossing the road, if it only works when the car in front is also a Volvo of at least the same vintage.

 

I appreciate innovation and profit, I am all for patents and the ability to profit from ingenuity, that is essential for the motor industry to stay in business, and I do love cars. But I’m an idealist. What if the major car manufacturers licensed at least some IP to each other. For example, develop a new safety feature which can read roadside speed signs and alert the driver via a HUD that they are going to fast and that the signs are different to the speed the navigation system is telling them. Then sell the IP to their competitors.

 

If each car manufacturer focused on one area of specialty, maybe innovation would speed up. They can still have plenty of unique features that make buyers select their model over the others, but we could enjoy safer, cheaper, more enjoyable driving sooner.

 

On the other side of the fence I love what Tesla have done, making their IP open source so that anyone can use it. That adds so much value to their brand in my book. If I could afford one, I would buy it just because I like their sense of supporting the community of tomorrow. What a great thing to do.

Continue reading

Posted in Scoop.it | Leave a comment

Foursquare refreshes Swarm with better check-ins, easier sharing …

Foursquare, the popular location-based social networking service, back in May took all the gamified features out of its main iOS client – the mayorships,

Source: www.idownloadblog.com

So what do you think of the new Facebook? Are you a bit confused? Is it doing the things you signed up to Facebook for? Is it better or worse? Do they have the gamification right, or was it better before.

 

It seems to be morphing a lot more into a social app where you can find out where your friends are, but I’m not sure where they are going with things like location based marketing and how the new gamification will work.

 

Obviously they need to keep reinventing themselves to find new audiences and revenue. Ar they on the right track? I’m really interested in your thoughts.

 

I do like the idea of who’s nearby and if I worked in the city I would probably use it more to catch up with friends and associates, but I’m not checking in anywhere as often as I used to.

Continue reading

Posted in Scoop.it | Leave a comment

Watch this: Human transforms its app data into striking activity maps

Now, the outfit has taken user data from 30 of the largest cities in the world and constructed visualizations for each locale. Maps for all three of the aforementioned endeavors are included, broken down by activity for further …

Source: www.engadget.com

I’ve tried a lot of LBS apps over the years and I’m always open to something new. So I’ve installed it, why don’t you do the same and we can move and make aesthetic map art together.

 

Watch my blog at luigicappel.wordpress.com and we can compare notes. I’ve used a lot of apps to track fitness, walking travel etc. I’ve done the 10,000 steps program, Map My Walk and lots more, After a while they get boring unless they keep evolving or offer something you can’t get anywhere else.

 

The installation was quick and the app is free. So lets see where this takes us. See you out there:)

Continue reading

Posted in Scoop.it | Leave a comment